Recently I wrote about a new project I was considering, and the 16 questions from Seth Godin that forced me to really think about the fundamental motivations for starting it in the first place.

One of the first things we had to do was to prepare a pitch for a potential customer for the project. In essence, we were going to propose a fundamental change in their thinking about how to generate extra revenue for the company. That made me think about another blog post by Seth Godin: Change and its constituents.

We decided to make a list of all the stake holders within the organization of our potential customer. Using this list, we established if they might feel hurt by the proposed change or benefit from it (or perhaps even both). This enabled us to prepare a response for every objection that we might encounter.

The pitch was going to be for senior executives in the organization, and our first task would be to win them over. But after we left, they would have to go and essentially sell our proposal to the rest of the company. Handing them an appropriate response for each possible objection we could think of might just make the difference.